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HomeCricket NewsDravid: Cricket In A Bio-Secure Environment Seems Impractical

Dravid: Cricket In A Bio-Secure Environment Seems Impractical

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Resumption of cricket in a bio-secure environment planned by the England and Wales cricket board seems ‘unrealistic’ to former Indian cricket maestro Rahul Dravid, who believes this to be an ‘impossible task’ for the boards around the globe to simulate it.

The idea of a bio-secure cricket environment was initiated because of the current outburst of Covid-19 pandemic outburst. This is a move by England to encourage resumption of international cricket.

England are currently planning to host a three-test Test series against West Indies, with the Caribbean players travelling a month well-in advance to begin their quarantine and begin training ahead of the series. Should the concept of bio-secure environment be incorporated, the Englishmen would have to stay away from their families for a considerable period of time – a timeframe of nearly nine weeks as per the reports.

“It is a bit unrealistic to have things at the level the ECB is talking about. Obviously, the ECB is very keen to conduct these series because they have had no other cricket and it is right in the middle of the season. Even if they are potentially able to create a bubble and manage it in that way, I think it will be impossible for everyone to do it with the kind of calendar that we have, with the travelling that you do on tours and the number of people involved,” Dravid said, while speaking on a webinar organised by YUVA, a non-profit organisation for the under privileged sportspersons in India.

The former Indian team captain also raised a concern over what would become of a particular Test match game when a player detects positive for Covid-19 in middle of the game.

Dravid: Cricket In A Bio-Secure Environment Seems Impractical
Image Courtesy: The Hindu

“All of us are hoping that things will evolve with time and get better once we have better medication. In case of the bio-bubble, you do all the testing, the quarantine and then on day two of the Test match, what if one player tests positive? What happens then? The rules, as they stand now, will see the Public Health Department coming in and putting everyone in quarantine.

“So that ends the Test match or the series and that ends all the expenses that were made to get everyone there and create that environment. We’re going to have to work with the Health Department and Government authorities to find out a way in which even if a player tests positive, the whole tournament isn’t cancelled,” Dravid said.

Meanwhile, Dravid said the uncertainty surrounding cricket is not something recent for the sportspersons. Also, he strongly believes it won’t take long for the cricketers to get back on their feet and bring their best game on field when cricket returns post the pandemic.

“As a sportsman, we are used to dealing with a lot of uncertainty during our careers. Everything doesn’t fall into place. You tend to get scared and worried about stuff but I think one of the things that I would have done is think about things I can control.

Dravid: Cricket In A Bio-Secure Environment Seems Impractical
Image Courtesy: The Hindu

“All you can control is your preparation, practice, emotional and mental well-being. You cannot control your results or performances. Coming back after this for active players… maybe it would take a bit of time to catch up to their original skill level. But that won’t take long. It is just like riding a bicycle,” he stated.

As far as playing in an empty stadium is concerned, which is most likely to be the case in near future, the former Indian batsmen also mentioned that players will eventually get used to it.

“At a professional level, players will adjust and not let it affect their performances much. A professional, once he or she gets on to the field, has a lot of pride in oneself. So they will find a way to deal with that.

“But the experience at the end of the day is not going to be the same. Players love to perform in front of a crowd, engage with their fans and that adds incredible complexity to a sport. I think that’s what a player will definitely miss. There is a personal self-satisfaction when you perform in front of a large crowd,” he concluded by adding this.

Do you think a bio-secure environment is most-probable to be the future of cricket? If yes, let us know why in the comments below. And for more such massively-hit content, stay glued to Mad Over Cricket.

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